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Why Are We Paying So Much Money For Health Insurance When We Still Can't Afford Care?

 

The Boston Globe published an article on March 23, 2016  titled Even With Insurance, Mass Residents Often Can’t Afford Healthcare and I can’t even begin to explain how true this is. They really hit the nail on the head with this topic!  Being a young adult, I can completely relate to what it’s like to not be able to afford health insurance. Not until last year did I really begin to understand how expensive health insurance really is. I started working for a big company which offered “the best” health insurance (no need to mention names).  I was so excited to think I had this ‘top of the line’ health insurance.  It was all great until of course, I made my first visit to the ER. With a very expensive co-pay, high deductible, and multiple bills later, I realized how unaffordable healthcare truly is. Just as this article states, having health insurance doesn’t necessarily mean you can afford care. I immediately noticed- yes, I finally have “great” health insurance, but does it even matter when I can’t afford to go to the doctor? With the statistics from the survey BCBS conducted, clearly I’m not the only one in the same boat. As mentioned in the article “43% of people said in 2015 health care and costs had caused problems for them and their families, including 19% who went without needed care as a result.” How crazy is it that almost 50% of the people surveyed have issues with health care costs?!  That’s a huge percentage, which includes me, and possibly you too. We already have so many bills to pay and stress about, healthcare really shouldn’t be one of them. Another thing I noticed from the article are the comments being posted.  So many people are complaining about this issue, yet they don’t want to do a single thing about it or, perhaps, they don’t know of other options out there. I think it’s time we start doing our research as healthcare consumers and see what other options we have out there!

This article really struck a chord with me, especially now knowing about Direct Primary Care and really understanding what it is. I wish I would have known about DPC earlier, or even know DPC was an option. Of course we do still need health insurance, but why not choose DPC for our primary care needs? This way we don’t have to deal with co-pays or high deductibles from our health insurance, not to mention getting more personalized care, appointments in a reasonable amount of time and honestly, a real connection with your doctor. Why wouldn’t you want a real connection with your doctor?!  They are the ones who are dealing with a big part of your life; your health. The article from the Boston Globe should really relate to many of us, and also be an eye opener. With the results from the survey by BCBS, we can’t deny health insurance is way too expensive and we just aren’t receiving the best care for the amount we are paying. Instead, we end up with a huge headache because of very high bills and often poor to mediocre healthcare.

 

Written by Jessica Leon, Administrative Assistant; Gold Direct Care

2 Comments

  1. Meghann L Dunn on April 13, 2016 at 4:17 pm

    Go Jess! Nice blog post!



  2. Lee on March 22, 2017 at 3:50 am

    So true. I have Lupus and as a result need to see a Rheumatologist but also should be regularly seeing a neurologist for the neuropathy, cardiologist for myocarditis, ENT for the rhinitis sinusitis, pulmonologist for the pleuritis, gastroenterologist for the gastritis, dermatologist for the psoriasis, ophthalmologist for the blepharitis, endocrinologist for the thyroiditis and probably more than I’m forgetting. While I make a modest salary, I’m a single mother in an expensive state and pay a $250 biweekly premium but must meet a $6,000 deductible before my employer sponsored plan will pay a sent for medications or doctor visits. I take the max out on an FSA card but that doesn’t even cover half a year of my own monthly meds, let alone doctor visits and injections for my sons genetic growth disorder. I haven’t seen a doctor in 6 months and yet I’m terrified to walk into any of my doctors offices knowing they’ll hound me on my outstanding bills. How is this okay?